Certain medications can affect how food tastes, according to the National Institute on Aging. Ask your doctor to suggest other options if the medications you take affects your appetite. Some medications can also interact with certain foods and nutritional supplements. If you’re taking a medication, it’s wise to check with your doctor or pharmacist to find out whether you need to make any changes to your diet.
Older adults can have trouble understanding and accepting the need for change, so it’s best to introduce new ideas gradually rather than all at once. Working towards a healthier diet in increments can make the overall change seem less overwhelming and painful. Try to share meals with your aging loved one as often as possible. You are not just making sure they eat their vegetables without dousing them in salt; you are also keeping them company. Meals are best enjoyed with other people, and seniors often eat better when they are not dining alone.
You can find trusted nutrition information in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which contain advice about what and how much to eat and which foods to avoid. Every 5 years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services use the latest nutrition research to develop these Guidelines that encourage people to eat healthier.
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