It’s not uncommon for older adults to have special needs related to a healthy diet, according to the National Council on Aging.  As you age, you become more susceptible to chronic health problems, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and osteoporosis. To help prevent or treat these conditions, your doctor may recommend that you eat foods that are rich in nutrients, but low in excess calories, processed sugars, sodium (salt), and saturated and trans fats.
The National Institutes of Health lists taste disorder as one of the conditions that might interfere with a healthy diet for seniors. Taste disorders might cause people to lose their appetite. It may be tempting to use sugar or salt to make food more appealing, but the NIH recommends flavoring food with herbs and spices instead. Of course, as with all diet recommendations, ask your doctor for guidance about nutrition for seniors – particularly you.

We advise that those who are in the process of selecting a senior living community for themselves or a loved one, experience at least one meal at each community they are considering. It’s important to taste the food and be there in person to feel out the dining experience. Mealtimes are also a good time to visit senior living communities because they provide a great opportunity to meet residents.


What’s more, simple causes such as a decreased sense of taste or dental problems can lead to seniors eating less and make it appear as though their appetite has decreased when it hasn’t. Seniors should weigh themselves (or be weighed by their caregivers) periodically to look for changes. Any sudden weight loss should be seen as a red flag and warrants a visit to the doctor.
Unfortunately, the most affordable foods are also some of the most unhealthy, so poverty can drive malnutrition. A diet that is rich in calories but bereft of nutrients will cause one to simultaneously gain weight and develop deficiency diseases (illnesses caused by lack of vitamins). This results in a bizarre phenomenon unique to developed nations, which is the presence of seniors (and sometimes adults in other age groups) who are simultaneously malnourished and overweight.
This issue is especially relevant to seniors because difficulty cooking can cause a senior to adopt a diet where the main staple is a pre-packaged meal or an unhealthy indulgence of a particular food group. Even seniors who are attempting to gain weight should eat a balanced diet rather than fill themselves with foods that are high in fat, salt, and sugar or low in nutrients.
I am a registered dietitian and licensed nursing home administrator, With decades of experience in nursing home administration and nutrition, I now recruit other like-minded and qualified consultants to serve my clients. Over the years, Balanced Senior Nutrition has grown into a full-service consulting firm with dietitians servicing nursing homes, assisted living facilities, home health agencies and community organizations throughout Florida.

It’s often difficult to understand why some people pass away at age a young age and others live well into their nineties. The body works in mysterious ways but being proactive at any age is key. I like to share a quote with my patients that I read at a hospital while I was still in college: “Medicine is sick care. Nutrition is health care.” People of all ages should consider this quote while striving to increase their own health and quality of life and that of their loved ones.
A common disease found in people 50 and older is type 2 diabetes. Dietary fiber is beneficial for slowing down the release of sugar into the bloodstream, which decreases and stabilizes blood glucose levels. Fiber is also important for digestion, lowering cholesterol and helping maintain a healthy weight. It will help promote regular bowel movements as well. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that males 51 and older consume 28 grams of dietary fiber each day and females 51 and older should consume 22.4 grams. Plant foods (beans, vegetables, fruits, nuts and whole grains) are the best source of fiber and tend to be nutrient dense as well—a win-win!
This issue is especially relevant to seniors because difficulty cooking can cause a senior to adopt a diet where the main staple is a pre-packaged meal or an unhealthy indulgence of a particular food group. Even seniors who are attempting to gain weight should eat a balanced diet rather than fill themselves with foods that are high in fat, salt, and sugar or low in nutrients.
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