Certain medications can affect how food tastes, according to the National Institute on Aging. Ask your doctor to suggest other options if the medications you take affects your appetite. Some medications can also interact with certain foods and nutritional supplements. If you’re taking a medication, it’s wise to check with your doctor or pharmacist to find out whether you need to make any changes to your diet.

Weight loss is a common concern for many older seniors. It may become necessary to eat every two or three hours, eat larger portions at the time of day when your appetite is strongest, incorporate healthy fats into your diet, make healthy smoothies for snacks, and have a healthy bedtime snack. Additionally, if you smoke, then speak to a healthcare professional about resources that can help you quit. (Smoking can reduce your appetite and ability to taste.)

More than 1 in 3 seniors in the care of others is at risk for under- or mal-nutrition (Mayo Clinic/American Dietetic Association). Malnutrition is the lack of proper nutrition, not necessarily a lack of food. Detecting malnutrition in seniors may be difficult, and even seniors who eat enough may be eating the wrong foods to keep themselves healthy. At Comfort Keepers®, we help seniors live healthy, independent lives and promote senior nutrition through the Nourish Senior Life® initiative.
“Rough up” your diet. Include a variety of high-fiber foods every day, such as raw fruits and vegetables and whole grains. These foods help cut down on constipation; provide the vitamins, minerals, fiber, and nutrients that you need for healthy aging; help maintain your weight; and reduce your risk of heart problems. If you’re not sure you’re getting enough fiber, talk to your doctor about supplements.
You can do many things on a daily basis to help ensure that your nutrition goals stay on track. First, eat regularly. Most healthcare professionals recommend that you eat three meals a day and have healthy snacks in between. Include at least three food groups with every meal. Choose fresh, plant-based foods first, eat whole grains, limit red meat, and avoid processed and high-sugar foods. Here are some additional tips:

Eating guidelines provided by nutrition experts and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are based on decades of research into health. Educational tools such as MyPlate communicate the components of a healthy diet in a simple way that anyone can understand. Unfortunately, most eating guidelines do not provide for the nuances and special nutritional needs of seniors:

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